Saturday, February 04, 2012

I May Never Finish College, Part Duex

Back in 2008 I posted a list of the classes at OU that I'd like to some day take.  Tonight I decided to revisit the topic.

I found all of these classes listed on the OU Course Descriptions page.  The ones highlighted in yellow are ones the I definitely want to take, but if I had the time and the money, I'd take them all.


Classical Culture (CL C)

2213 Introduction to Classical Archaeology. Introductory survey of the archaeological discovery of the ancient civilizations of the Near and Middle East and the Mediterranean World, including the Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Hebrew, Roman, Minoan, Mycenaean, and Greek civilizations. Attention is given to principal sites for each civilization, their discovery, and the techniques and methodology of classical archaeology. (F, Sp)

2383 Classical Mythology. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Lectures, with assigned readings. The origin and development of Greek and Roman myths indispensable for the understanding of ancient and modern literature; with allusion to their influence on art and religion. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-WC]

2603 Survey of Ancient Greek Culture. Traces the development of the democratic ideal in Greece through the Classical period. Aspects of culture such as literature, religion, art and architecture, educataion, science and technology, intellectual life and the role of women are emphasized. (F) [IV-WC]

2613 Survey of Ancient Roman Culture.  Examines the development and dissemination of Roman civilization in ancient times and its influence on the modern world.  Aspects of Roman culture such as literature, law, religion, art and architecture, education, intellectual life, popular entertainment, and the role of women are emphasized. (Sp)



3053 Origins of Christianity: Jesus to Augustine. Prerequisite: English 1213. A survey of early Christian history that aims to set the Christian scriptures in their cultural and political context. Canonical, non-canonical, Jewish, and pagan sources are read alongside one another in order to consider the interrelationships among various religious ideas in the roman world. (F)

3113 Ancient Epic Poetry in English Translation. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. The epic poetry of Homer, Hesiod, Vergil and other Greek and Roman writers in its literary and historical context. The epic tradition in later European literature. (F) [IV-WC]

3123 Ancient Drama in English Translation. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Lectures on the development of the ancient Greek and Roman drama. Lectures with readings and discussion from the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plautus, Terence, and Seneca and from Aristotle's Poetics. The influence of ancient drama on European literature. (Sp) [IV-WC]

3133 Plato and the Platonic Tradition. A study of the major ideas in the central works of Plato and of their influence on the Neoplatonists. (Sp) [IV-WC]

3153 Vice and Virtue in Ancient Rome. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. The transformation of the character of ancient Romans from the early Republican period through the Empire. Focus on changes in their value system brought about through the acquisition of an empire, intrusion of Greek ideas, results of specific historical events, and actions of specific individuals.

3173 Freedom in Greece. The ideas and institutions of liberty in Greece. Focus is on the Athenian democracy and the relationship between democracy and the art and literature of Athens. (F) [IV-WC]

3183 Hellas, the Civilization of Ancient Greece. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. Hellas examines the human factor dominating western history, philosophy, literature and political science as Greek civilization chronologically evolves. Responsible behavior, balance and control are the lessons of all Greek literature, art, philosophy and social institutions. (Sp)

3193 Freedom in Rome. Covers the ideas and institutions of liberty in Rome. Focus is on the balanced constitution of the Roman republic individual and the emergence of new forms and conceptions of liberty. These ideas are taken from within the framework of the intellectual, social and political currents of the Roman Empire. (Sp) [IV-WC]

3233 The Roman Forum and Its Monuments. Focus on the excavation of the Roman Forum, the central part of ancient Rome. Concentrated study on archaeological methodology, specific excavations, topography of Rome and the cultural significance of Roman urban development on the ancient world. (Sp)

3313 Religions of Rome.  Prerequisite:  Junior standing.  This course surveys the religions that flourished in ancient Rome, from its beginning to the establishment of Christianity.  Particular attention will be given to syncretism and the key role that it played in the evolution of religious life at Rome. (F)

Astronomy (ASTR)

1504 General Astronomy. An introduction to the concepts of modern astronomy. The solar system, the sun and stars, the Milky Way and other galaxies, current theories of the origin, evolution and fate of the universe. Not for major credit. Students cannot receive credit in both 1504 and 1514. (F, Sp, Su) [II-NL]

1514 General Astronomy with Laboratory. An introduction to the concepts of modern astronomy. The solar system, the sun and stars, the Milky Way and other galaxies, current theories of the origin, evolution, and fate of the universe. Not for major credit. Students cannot receive credit in both 1504 and 1514.Laboratory (F, Sp, Su) [II-LAB]

1523 Life in the Universe. Introductory astronomy course focusing on general physical conditions under which life is thought to arise and evolve in the universe. Topics include historical astronomy, gravitation and planetary orbits, the solar system. The earth’s geology and atmosphere, stellar evolution, theories for the origin of life on earth, the discoveries of extrasolar planets, and the search for extraterrestrial life. Course is not for major credit in physics and astronomy, however it is appropriate for Journalism and Mass Communications, Zoology, Education and Chemistry majors as well as others who want an introduction to our current understanding of life in the universe. (Sp)


College of Arts and Sciences (CAS)

2033 Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector. Explains what the nonprofit sector is and does. Examines contemporary issues, debates, and news reports concerning nonprofits’ managerial practices and considers pending policy proposals that affect nonprofits so that students can acquire a better understanding of these organizations and learn analytical skills. (F)

2043 Introduction to Leadership. The general purpose of this course is to learn about contemporary thinking regarding leadership in organizations and the applications of these insights to the individual students for their growth as leaders. (F, Sp)

3033 Managing the Nonprofit Organization. Prerequisite: 2033 and junior standing or permission. A comprehensive overview of the nonprofit sector, its characteristics, and how to manage a nonprofit organization on a business model. Includes interaction with leading nonprofit and for-profit practitioners, as well as hands-on experience working with nonprofit organizations. (F, Sp)



Anthropology (ANTH)

1113 General Anthropology. An introduction to the anthropological way of thinking about biological evolution, fossil hominids, prehistory, the rise of civilization, ecology, war, the energy crisis, racism, sexism and other contemporary controversies. Emphasis is placed on cross-cultural, linguistic and relativistic perspectives. (F, Sp, Su) [III-SS]

1203 Language Across Cultures (Crosslisted with Linguistics 1203). Theories of language family origins and their relationship to human migration; tpes of human languages; linguistic concept of genetic relatedness; writing systems development; non-Western sociolinguistic and usage phenomena; cultural and scientific importance of endangered languages; how languages become endandered; factors involved in preservation. This course may not count for major credit. (Sp) [IV-NW]

1253 Folklore and Folklife. Introduces the academic study of folklore and folklife by introducing four key concepts: Tradition, community, art and performance. Verbal folklore, material culture, performance genres and customary knowledge will be examined. Issues of cultural diversity and historical change will be addressed. Special emphasis will be placed on exploring traditional cultures in the United States and Europe. (F) [IV-AF]

1413 Great Discoveries in Archaeology. Introduces students to the accomplishments of ancient civilizations around the world. A brief overview of archaeological methods and research and of the precursors of civilizations. Concentrates on major civilizations of the world including Mesopotamia, Europe, Egypt, sub-Saharan Africa, India, China, Southeast Asia, Mesoamerica, South America, and the North American Midwest. (F) [IV-NW]

1523 Prehistoric Foundations of Old World Civilization. The history of humans throughout the Eolithic, Paleolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages. Emphasis is placed upon the prehistory of Europe, although Africa and Asia are included wherever a broader knowledge contributes to a better understanding of the prehistoric foundations of Western European cultures. (F) [III-SS]

1823 Religion in Everyday Life. This course focuses on the variety of religious phenomena found throughout the world and the theoretical approaches anthropologists use to account for them. Using ethnographic studies of belief in practice, we will seek to understand the role that religions play in the human experience. (F, Sp) [IV-NW]

3043 Mythology and Folklore (Crosslisted with Modern Languages and Literatures 3043). Prerequisite: none. The nature and function of myth and folklore in human societies, and the uses to which the study of folklore have been put by anthropologists in both functional and culture-historical analyses of preliterate societies. (F, Sp) [IV-WC]

3053 Phonology (Crosslisted with Linguistics 3053). Prerequisite: Anthropology or Linguistics 3033. Phonology is the study of sound patterns found in human language. Provides a grounding in phonological theory by examining data from several of the world's languages. Covers the phoneme-allophone distinction, distinctive features, feature re-write rules, and a broad sampling of phonological phenomena. (Irreg.)

3063 Language and Culture (Crosslisted with Linguistics 3063). Prerequisite: 2303. The relationships between language and the rest of culture, with emphasis on diachronic as well as synchronic problems. Such crucial issues as the limitation of language on thought and perception and language and conceptualization are also considered. (Sp)

3083 Advanced Studies in Folklore and Expressive Culture. Prerequisite: 1113 or junior standing. Introduces students to the critical study of folklore and public culture. The effects of folklore and public culture on human social interaction and how we interpret and understand these effects will be studied. Topics include festivals, foodways, folk arts and crafts, and musical and other performance genres. (Irreg.)

3333 The Aztec World. Prerequisite: 1113 or junior standing. An in-depth analysis of Aztec culture (circa 1519), history, customs, and life-ways leading to an appreciation of a starkly different world view and culminating in a research paper based on primary sources. (F) [IV-NW]

3373 Archaeology of Death and Burial. Prerequisite: 1113 or junior standing. Provides a cross-cultural survey of mortuary practices in the ancient world and examines how such practices shaped, and were shaped by, the lifestyles and world views of people in our past. (Irreg.)

3423 Anthropology of Religion. Prerequisite: 1113 or junior standing. A consideration of the nature and role of religion in small-scale societies. Emphasis will be given to the relationship of the various anthropological approaches to religion with the intellectual history of anthropology as a discipline. (Irreg.)

3803 Asian Prehistory. Prerequisite: 1113 or junior standing. A survey of the archaeological remains from the Asian continent beginning with the Paleolithic and continuing through to the beginning of the Historic period. Some emphasis will be placed on the development of Chinese civilization. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

3893 Maya, Aztec and Inca: High Civilizations of Ancient America. Prerequisite: 1113 or junior standing. An archaeological and ethnological study of the pre-Spanish cultures of Mesoamerica and the Central Andes giving primary emphasis to the Maya of Yucatan, the Aztec of Mexico and the Inca of Peru. (F, Sp) [IV-NW]




History (HIST)

1723 East Asia to 1600. A general survey of the histories of China and Japan with the history of Korea included as it bears upon the historyof Japan. The focus is on the political, social, economic, and intellectual aspects of China and Japan, and their points of contact. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

1733 East Asia Since 1600. A general survey of the histories of China, Japan, and Korea from 1600 to the present. Focus is on the political, social, and economic systems of these countries, major historical events and intra-Asian interactions. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

1913 World Civilizations to 1600. Deals with the entire globe rather than with some one country or region; deals with all peoples, not just with Western or non-Western peoples. Focuses on historical forces or movements of worldwide influence. Comparative history. (F) [IV-WC]

1923 World Civilization 1600-Present. Deals with the entire globe rather than with one country or region; deals with all peoples, not just with so-called Western or non-Western peoples. Focuses on historical forces or movements of worldwide influence. Comparative history. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

2003 Egypt: From Cheops to Mubarrak. The course will explore the history of Egypt from earlier times to today.Highlights include the pyramid age, Nefertiti, Cleopatra, the birth of Christian monasticism, the Crusades, Napoleon's invasion, the Suez Canal, Lawrence of Arabia, and peacemaking in the Middle East.No background is required.(Irreg.)

2013 Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations. A study of the major civilizations of the Ancient Near East from the last Pluvial period (ca. 8400 B.C.) through the first millennium B.C., with particular emphasis on the historic periods (ca. 3000 B.C. onwards). (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

2023 Greek and Roman Civilization. Covers the major political events of Greco-Roman history and civilization, but considerable attention will be devoted to Greek and Roman religion, historical writing, Roman law, engineering, and architecture; also Periclean Athens and Augustan Rome. Contributions of these civilizations to our own will be described. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

2203 Religion/Archaeology of the Near East, Egypt and Mediterranean. Investigates archaeology of key cities and events of the Mediterranean and the Near Eastern cultures. As a part of the study of these cultures we include aspects of religion and architecture. (Irreg.)

2403 History of Japanese Culture. Prerequisite: 1723 or 1733 or sophomore standing or permission of instructor. Historical examination of the intellectual and artistic achievements that distinguish Japan's contributions to world culture, put in the context of the country's changing state formations (from imperial state, to feudal regime, to modern nation). (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

2683 Introduction to Islam. Survey of the history of Islamic civilization in the Near East, North Africa, India and Malaysia from the advent of the Prophet to the modern period. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

3003 History of Sparta. Traces the history of Sparta from its antecedents in the Heroic Age through the Dorian Invasion to the Roman conquest.(Sp) [IV-WC]

3013 Archaic Greece. An examination of the history of ancient Greece from the earliest times to the fifth century, with emphasis upon Minoan Crete, Mycenaean Greece, Homeric Greece and the Archaic era (c. 3000 to 500 B.C.). (F) [IV-WC]

3033 Alexander the Great. Prerequisite: junior standing. Examines the Macedonian and 4th Century Greek background of Alexander, the career of Alexander, and the legacy of Alexander (the Hellenistic world). Topics include the breakdown of Greek unity, Alexander’s conquests and military genius, his sudden death and the resulting wars of succession, the culture of the Hellenistic period. (Alt. F) [IV-WC]

3043 Egypt and Mesopotamia. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. A study of the ancient histories and cultures, literatures, religious thought, political ideas, and art. (Irreg.)

3053 Medieval Italy. Prerequisite: 1113 or 1613 or junior standing. A survey of Italy from circa 400-1350 CE, emphasizing the mix of Roman, Christian, and barbarian traditions, relations between the church and empire, and the role of cities and commerce. (Sp) [IV-WC]

3283 History of Ireland, Part II. Examines the history of Ireland from 1600 to the present day. Looks at the British conquest of Ireland, subsequent Anglo-Irish relations, events leading to Irish independence, and the origins and causes of present day sectarian violence. (Sp-alternate) [IV-WC]

3413 Hebrew Civilization in Ancient Times. A topical survey from 1400 B.C. to 425 A.D., dealing critically with the main institutions and their historical background from early tribal theocracy to the end of the Rabbinic Patriarchate under Rome. (Sp) [IV-WC]

3733 History of Heaven and Hell in Judaism and Christianity. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Traces the evolution of the concept of the afterlife, eternal reward and punishment in Judaism and Christianity from late Antiquity to the high Middle Ages. (Irreg.)


3853 Japan to 1850. Prerequisite: 1723 or 1733 or junior standing. Trace the history of Japan beginning with the earliest Jomon and Yayoi cultures and ending with the unraveling of the last feudal regime in the nineteenth century. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

3863 Japan Since 1850. Prerequisite: 1723 or 1733 or junior standing. Designed to introduce students to the history of Japan from the 1850's to the present. Will include the Meiji restoration, industrial development, imperial expanison, wartime mobilization, the U.S. occupation, economic recovery and high growth, and the changing political and popular culture of the 1980s and 1990s. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

3873 Early Imperial China. Prerequisite: 1723 or junior standing or permission of instructor. The cultural, political, economic, and social transformations China underwent during the period from the Sui to the Song dynasties. (Alt. F) [IV-NW]

3883 Late Imperial China. Prerequisite: 1723 or 1733 or junior standing or permission of instructor. The cultural, political, economic, and social transformations China underwent during the rule of its later dynasties from the 13th-century Mongol conquest to the final stuggles and collapse of China's existence as an empire with the Revolution of 1911. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

3893 Culture and Society in the Middle East. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Covers the major social and cultural conflicts which have defined the peoples and states of the modern Middle East from 1800 to the present. The focus will be on Turkey, Iran, Egypt and Israel. History texts, primary documents, and novels will be read. Particular attention will be paid to the debates over the place of women and religion. (Irreg.)

3913 The Samurai in Japanese History. Prerequisite: 1723 or 1733 or 3853. Explores the history of the most popular figure in Japanese history. Covers warfare and invasion before the formation of the early state up to the suicide of the last Samurai in 1970. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

3923 China since 1911. Prerequisite: 1733 or junior standing or permission of instructor. An examination of Chinese history since the Revolution of 1911, including the development of Republican and Communist thought, warlord rule, China's tumultuous wartime period, and the rise of the People's Republic of China (PRC). The course will also cover the history of the PRC, China after Mao, Taiwan and China's changing position in the world. (Irreg.)) [IV-NW]

3933 History of the Great Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe and America (Crosslisted with Womens' Studies 3933). Prerequisite: junior standing. Covers an important era in the history of human rights and misogyny while offering a view of early modern Europe through social, legal, political, and religious lenses. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3973 Judaism—A Religious History. Prerequisite: junior standing. Introductory survey of Judaism from its earliest origins in the ancient Near East to the present. Development of ideas, forms of worship, and religious expression as well as sectavian trends and variations will be examined. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

3983 Medieval Jewish History. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of Jewish history from the fall of the Second Temple in 70 C.E. to the expulsion from Spain in 1492. Primary emphasis on the social and intellectual history of the Jewish communities of the Islamic world and of Latin Christendom and their relations with the two great medieval civilizations. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

3993 The Evolution of Martyrdom in the Judeo-Christian Civilization. Prerequisite: junior standing. Traces the historical development of martyrdom in Judaism and Christianity to understand what motivated individuals and communities to give up their lives for their convictions. Compare the evolution of the idea of martyrdom in Judaism and Christianity to identify differences and similarities between these two faiths. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

4023 Inquisitions. Prerequisite: 1223 or 1233 or junior standing or permission of the instructor. Examines the historical roots of inquisitions in order to better understand how they have shaped modern conflicts. The mechanisms people used for disciplining themselves, for imposing control on others, and for evaluating who has the right to participate in society reveals people’s fears, priorities, and weaknesses. (Irreg.)


4033 The Renaissance. Prerequisite: 1223 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines the European renaissance, a time period that was crucial to the development of western European culture, intellectual thought, and state formation. This pivotal time period built the foundations of modern western culture. (Irreg.)



4053 The Enlightenment. Prerequisite: 1223 or 1623 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Examination of the intellectual and cultural currents of eighteenth-century Europe and Colonial America. Topics to be considered include enlightenment critiques of orthodox religion, the rise of the public sphere and the relationship between the enlightenment and the French revolution. (Irreg.)


4103 Mythology in Ancient Greece and Rome. Prerequisite: 1613 or 2023 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Greek and Roman myth through primary sources in translation; social and political context of Greek and Roman myth; archaeological evidence related to Greek and Roman mythology. (Irreg.)


4203 Classical China. Prerequisite: 1723 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines the roots of Chinese civilization, from its pre-historical origins through its emergence as a formidable empire to its devolution during a lengthy period of civil war after the end of the Han dynasty. (Irreg.)



History of Science (HSCI)

2443 Science in a Religious World. An overview of major events in the intersection of science and religion from the Middle Ages to the present. A detailed look at the historical record and exploration of the background of the people involved, the social and political context, and the reasons why certain issues mattered so much. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

2453 God and Nature in the Pre-Scientific World. Explores the changing and multifaceted relationship between science and religion throughout the history of western culture up to the eighteenth century. Discusses collaborations as well as conflicts between Christianity and scientific investigation. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]


International and Area Studies (IAS)

1223 Introduction to Asian Philosophy (crosslisted with Philosophy 1223). Survey of the major figures and schools of philosophy in Asia. Includes study of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism. (Irreg.)

2103 Survey of Asian Civilizations and Cultures. Studies the three regions of Asia (India, east Asia and southeast Asia) with emphasis on philosophical, religious and cultural traditions, and patterns of social, economic and political change. Prepares students for further in-depth study of Asia and its greater regional influences. (Irreg.)

Letters (LTRS)

3113 The Examined Life I: Antiquity. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of the great books of Greece and Rome, with emphasis on understanding the impact of classical texts on modern day thought. Can be applied to the Letters major’s requirement in history, literature, or philosophy. (F)

3123 The Examined Life II: Middle Ages and Renaissance. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of the great books of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, with emphasis on the impact of these texts on modern thought. Can be applied toward the Letters major’s requirement in history, literature, or philosophy. (Sp)

3133 The Examined Life III: The Enlightenment. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of the great books of The Enlightenment, with emphasis on understanding the impact of these texts on modern thought. Can be applied toward the Letters Major’s requirement in history, literature, or philosophy. (F)


Liberal Studies (LSTD)

2203 Evil Acts, Religious Reasons. Examines the ways in which religious faith has been used to rationalize war, terrorism, ethnic cleansing and other evil acts. Using comparative religious study as a basis for inquiry, students will learn the five warning signs of imminent evil in the name of religion. This is an interdisciplinary course, drawing upon perspectives from religious history, sociology, education and religious philosophy. (F, Sp, Su)

4213 A Critical Review of the Bible as a Literary Work. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Examines the Bible as a work of literature, approaching it without concern for the doctrines of any particular religion. The aim of the course is to make students biblically familiar with both the Old and New Testaments. (F, Sp, Su)

4503 Stars: Science and Myth. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. A study the entire life cycle of stars through a descriptive point of view. The cultural impact of stars, shaping mythology and ritual, will also be examined. (F, Sp, Su)

Linguistics (LING)

1203 Language Across Cultures (Crosslisted with Anthropology 1203). Theories of language family origins and their relationship to human migration; tpes of human languages; linguistic concept of genetic relatedness; writing systems development; non-Western sociolinguistic and usage phenomena; cultural and scientific importance of endangered languages; how languages become endandered; factors involved in preservation. This course may not count for major credit. (Sp) [IV-NW]

3063 Language and Culture (Crosslisted with Anthropology 3063). Prerequisite: 2303. The relationships between language and the rest of culture, with emphasis on diachronic as well as synchronic problems. Such crucial issues as the limitation of language on thought and perception and language and conceptualization are also considered. (Sp)

Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics (MLLL)

3043 Mythology and Folklore. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission. Readings in folktales and myths from cultures around the world, with a focus on narrative structures and the role of the storyteller. Involves weekly reading and weekly writing assignments and a semester-log research project published on the internet. (No previous web publishing experience is required.) (F, Sp) [IV-WC]

3063 Survey of Jewish Literature from Antiquity to the Present. Prerequisite: junior standing. Provides a survey of Jewish literature from the Hebrew Bible to contemporary American literature, presented as a journey in which stops will be made at important places, covering all significant periods, genres and prominent writers. (F) [IV-WC]

3073 The Hebrew Bible as Literature. Prerequisite: junior standing. The Hebrew Bible is the best selling book in America every single year. We will explore its greatness by reading various Biblical texts such as a great novella, the Joseph story; the greatest religious conversion narrative, Ruth; the poetry of Psalms, and the rise of David from shepherd to king, as well as other favorites to be determined by class participants. The course will explore issues such as what is literature; what is the Hebrew Bible; what does it mean to read the Bile from a literary perspective; what are the literary genres used to write the Bible, both prose an poetry, and what were the norms according to which these texts were written. Special attention will be given to close reading and textual analysis. (Sp) [IV-WC]


3303 The World of Dante. Prerequisite: Junior standing and English 1213. In this course students will engage in a close reading of a fundamental text in the western literary tradition: Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy. The course will also consider one of Dante’s minor works, the Vita Nuova, as well as the modern critical readings of Dante’s writing and thought. In lectures, special attention will be paid to the historical, political, literary and intellectual context of Dante’s poetry and thought. Students will also be asked to contribute to the classroom atmosphere by responding to questions and participating in discussions. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3453 The World of the Arabian Nights (Crosslisted with International and Area Studies 3453). Prerequisite: junior standing. This course explores the most famous literary product of the Arabo-Islamic civilization. It examines the work's structural narrative techniques, characters, settings and themes as well as the various aspects of its cultural and social milieu. In addition, the course examines the western perception of the Orient from the 18th century to today and the reception of the work in the Medieval period and in the present Arab world. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

3573 Arthurian Legend and Literature (Crosslisted with English 3573). Examination of the legend of King Arthur in European literature. Concentrate first on the historical Arthur, followed by major portion of semester on the medieval and modern literary texts concerning Arthur and the Round Table. All texts will be read in English translation. [IV-WC]




Religious Studies (RELS)

1113 Introduction to Religious Studies. Introduction to the study of religion. Examines inner workings and external practices of religion, including various definitions of religion, and how religion functions in the world through ritual, myth, and symbol. Analysis of varieties of religious experience, human destiny and the use of sacred texts among the world's religions. Not a comparative course, this course employs case studies. (F, Sp) [IV-WC]

2003 Special Topics in Introduction to Religious Studies. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Various topics in introduction to religious studies including comparative studies and theories in the study of religion. (Irreg.)

2013 Introduction to Religious Traditions. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. An introduction to religious traditions, examining traditions such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, and native traditions as well as other religious traditions. (Irreg.)

2143 Introduction to the Bible. Examines Biblical texts to better understand the Bible as the scriptural background of both Judaism and Christianity. Introduces students to modern scholarship and current debates surrounding the composition, themes, content, and dating of Biblical texts, and pays special attention to the historical and geographic circumstances that surround the composition of Biblical texts. (Irreg.)

2303 Islamic Religious Tradition. An exploration of the historical development of the world's second largest religious tradition. Investigation of the major tenets of Islam, the Qur'an, the life of Muhammad, ritual and worship, development of Islamic law and the spread of Islamic civilization and ideas. (Irreg.)

2403 Introduction to Comparative Religion.  A general study of the world’s most representative religious traditions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. A comparative consideration of the differences and similarities among the religions. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

2413 Religion, Culture, and the Meaning of Life. Examines religion as a resource for understanding values and for making meaning of life. The study will include comparative consideration of some religious traditions, as well as critical questions and analysis regarding the proper role and adequacy of religion. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

2703 Introduction to Buddhism. An introductory study of Buddhism, including sacred text and concepts; Examines the four noble truths, the noble eight-fold path; the four immeasurables, and the three traditions of Buddhism;  Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana Buddhism.  Examines the development of Buddhism from its Asian origins to its adaptation to western culture. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

2713 Introduction to Hinduism. Study of the tradition of Hinduism. Examines the historical development of the tradition as well as the thoughts of modern philosophers. Examines Aryan and early Indian culture, epics, scriptures, and philosophies that have developed. Explores fundamental premises and guiding principles and organic process of change. Generally inquires into the historical development of the Hindu religious tradition. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

2933 Introductory Topics in Eastern Religious Traditions. May be repeated with a change of content; maximum credit six hours.  An introductory course in a religious tradition such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Shinto, Taoism, Confucianism or othe Eastern tradition.  Includes historical context of the traditions, basic teaching and different approaches to their interpretation.  Examines organic process of religious and/or philosophical change.  (Irreg.)

2943 Introductory Topics in Indigenous Religious Traditions. May be repeated with a change on content; maximum credit six hours.  An introductory course in an indigenous or folk religious tradition.  Includes historical context of the tradition, basic teachings and different approaches to their interpretation examines organic process of religious and/or philosophical change.  (Irreg.)

3133 Introduction to Christianity. Prerequisite:  Junior standing or permission of instructor.  Broad phenomenological study of the religious tradition of Christianity.  Examines origins and early myths, the teacher and key element of his teachings, founders of the early movements, the spread of the tradition, sacred texts, key practices and rituals, symbols, moral codes and ethical issues, polity and leaders, challengers to its system of faith, and the globalization of Christianity.  (Irreg.)

3143 Christian Scriptures. Prerequisite:  Junior standing or permission of instructor.  Using historical criticism, students will study the dating authorship, historical setting, and liturgical and literary forms of the texts.  Attention will be given to the canonization process and a brief look at some of the deuteron-canonical texts from recent archaeological finds that shed new light on the history and development of the Christian sacred texts.  (Irreg.)

3153 Historical Jesus. Prerequisite:  Junior standing or permission of instructor.  Examines the character in the Christian Scriptures known as Jesus.  Study of the historical figure through a variety of scholarly perspectives in order to understand the diversity of beliefs within the Christian religion.  Employs a variety of scholarly and historical schemes for understanding and interpreting the man and his life. (Irreg.)

3163 New Testament/Early Christian Literature. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines the history and literature of the earliest Christian communities, from the lifetime of Jesus through the legalization of Christianity under the Emperor Constantine. Special emphasis on understanding the historical context of early Christian writings, especially the letters of Paul and a range of canonical and apocryphal gospels. (Irreg.)

3183 Lost Christian Scriptures. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. This course studies the vast array of writings that were read by early Christians but not included in the Bible. Readings will include originally Jewish texts that were popular with Christians, such as the Books of Enoch and the Life of Adam and Eve; apocryphal gospels attributed to Thomas, Peter, and other apostles; narratives about Jesus' birth and childhood, such as the Revelation of the Magi and the Childhood Deeds of Jesus; accounts of the apostles' travels, teaching, and miracles; and fragmentary Gnostic Christian writings discovered in Egypt. Familiarity with the New Testament will be helpful for participants, but not required. (Irreg.)



3313 World Religions in America. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. The United States of America is arguably the world's most religiously diverse nation at the beginning of the 21st century. The framers of the Constitution could not have imagined the scope of religious diversity in the United States today when they wrote the famous sixteen words of the First Amendment: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof...." This course explores the history of and contemporary challenges and opportunities presented by the presence of and freedom for adherents of the world's religions in America. Through readings, class lectures and discussion, guest lectures, and access to superb electronic resources, students will become conversant with multiple factors that have shaped the American experience and are as current as the headlines in today's news. (Irreg.)

3663 Greek and Roman Religion. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of the religious rituals, beliefs, and sacred sites of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Examines myths about and worship of gods, domestic and public religion, how Greek and Roman religion differ, and change in Greek and Roman religion over time. (Irreg.)


3683 Christian Heresies. Prerequisite: junior standing. Investigates the relationship between religious orthodoxy and heresy, and how the clamor for the former only generated more of the latter. We will examine what became orthodox and why and how, and what heresies emerged, persisted or re-emerged, and under what conditions. We will examine how cultural, socio-economic, ethnic, and political/power relationships impinged upon the definition and evolution of authority, orthodoxy, and heresy. The goals of this course include the tracing of the recurrence of ancient heretical ideas into the modern period, and the consequences of the orthodox/heterodox dialectic across Christian history. (Irreg.)


3723 Buddhist Meditation Traditions. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. This course provides the opportunity to explore in detail systems and techniques of meditation within different traditions of Buddhism. Meditation is understood as necessary to fulfilling the highest goals of Buddhism.Yet different traditions within Buddhism have had different understandings of what meditation entails and how it relates to other aspects of the complex of the Buddhist tradition as a whole.One goal of this course will be to examine different conceptions of meditation and how these different conceptions affect the understanding of the Buddhist life.We will also consider, from the perspective of the philosophy of religion, the issue of the validity of religious experience in meditation as a source of gnosis and self-transformation that crosses religious and sectarian boundaries. (Irreg.)


4203 Religion, Nationalism, and Ethnic Conflict. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines the role of religion in the formation and maintenance of ethnic groups, in the rise of nationalism, and in conflicts between different groups; evaluates the role religion and religious communities have played, and continue to play, in ethnic conflict around the world. (Irreg.)


Sociology (SOC)

3683 Wealth, Power, and Prestige. Prerequisite: 1113 or sophomore standing or above. Examines the systems in which the central elements of class stratification--wealth, power, and prestige--are created and distributed and addresses the issue of "who gets how much and why?". Topics include a review of the theories and evidence in current stratification studies and an assessment of the racial, ethnic, and religious correlates of inequality. (F, Sp)

3873 Religion and Society. Prerequisite: junior standing. An analysis of the functional significance of religion in society. Topics include the distinction between magic and religion, the functional approach to social phenomena, the relationship between religion and the problem of order in human societies, the relationship between religion and other major institutional arrangements (e.g., the economy and the polity). (F, Su)









English (ENGL)

3513 Medieval English Literature. Intensive study of some of the major literary works of medieval England with attention to the relation between the literature and its social, intellectual and cultural contexts. Readings in various genres will include such works as Gawain and the Green Knight, Everyman, Piers Plowman, Morte d'Arthur, and The Canterbury Tales. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3813 Science Fiction. Prerequisite: 1213. An introduction to a major genre of popular culture. Focuses on the philosophical, social, and creative values of science as a central constituent of modern life. Students explore the social, moral, and political issues at stake in science fiction's critique and occasional celebration of scientific culture. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

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